Between Philosophy and Literature: Bakhtin and the Question by Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan

By Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan

This is often an unique interpreting of Mikhail Bakhtin within the context of Western philosophical traditions and counter-traditions. The e-book portrays Bakhtin as a Modernist philosopher torn among an ideological secularity and a profound non secular sensibility, constantly desirous about questions of ethics and impelled to show from philosophy to literature as differently of knowing.

Most significant experiences of Bakhtin spotlight the fragmented and it sounds as if discontinuous nature of his paintings. Erdinast-Vulcan emphasizes, as a substitute, the underlying coherence of the Bakhtinian undertaking, interpreting its inherent ambivalences as an intersection of philosophical, literary, and mental insights into the dynamics of embodied subjectivity. Bakhtin's flip to literature and poetry, in addition to the dissatisfactions that inspired it, align him with 3 different "exilic" Continental philosophers who have been his contemporaries: Bergson, Merleau-Ponty, and Levinas. Adopting Bakhtin's personal open-ended method of the human sciences, the booklet phases a chain of philosophical encounters among those thinkers, highlighting their respective itineraries and impasses, and producing a Bakhtinian synergy of rules.

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Between Philosophy and Literature: Bakhtin and the Question of the Subject

This can be an unique examining of Mikhail Bakhtin within the context of Western philosophical traditions and counter-traditions. The booklet portrays Bakhtin as a Modernist philosopher torn among an ideological secularity and a profound spiritual sensibility, perpetually serious about questions of ethics and impelled to show from philosophy to literature as differently of figuring out.

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Extra info for Between Philosophy and Literature: Bakhtin and the Question of the Subject

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Always develops on the boundary between two consciousnesses, two subjects” (PT, 106). Working on these boundaries between the Bakhtinian project and those of his fellow exiles, the study will thus attempt to tune in, not only to the “said,” but also to the “unsaid” in Bakhtin’s work (TMHS, 163); to its “potentialities,” elicited through encounters and intersections with others’ thought; and to its contextual meanings, understood in relation, not only to the past or to immediate contemporary contexts, but also to future, unanticipated conversations.

The labor of philosophical midwifery attempted here is meant to bring out the potential implications of what has remained understated or latent in Bakhtin’s writings through a dialogic encounter with his fellow exiles. Other dotted lines, other relations, could obviously have been drawn, so it is one of the tasks of this volume to bring home to the reader the philosophical productivity of this particular constellation and the reasons why it is, to my mind, so compelling. What justifies the clustering, I would argue, is a common exilic sensibility in more than one sense.

He] placed the idea on the borderline of dialogically intersecting consciousnesses. . He extended, as it were, these distantly separated ideas by means of a dotted line to the point of their dialogic intersection. In so doing, he anticipated future dialogic encounters between ideas which in his time were still dissociated. (PDP, 91) This drawing of dotted lines, as Bakhtin recognizes at a later phase of his work, is not the exclusive prerogative of the artistic project. Distinct Dostoyevskian echoes are heard in the late notes, where Bakhtin extrapolates his conception and turns it into a working principle: like the human subject who has “no sovereign internal territory” (TRDB, 287), who lives on its own boundary lines and occasionally transgresses them in the interaction with other subjects, “each word (each sign) of the text exceeds its boundaries.

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